Posts from October 2015.

Last week a Federal District Court ruled a disgruntled former employee could proceed with her interference and retaliation claims under the FMLA even though she never actually took any FMLA-qualifying leave. The case serves as a reminder of just how easily an employee triggers the statute’s broad protections.

The former employee submitted completed FMLA paperwork relating to a chronic condition and the employer approved her request to take intermittent leave, as needed, in the future. She never actually took leave under the statute and, in fact, she did not even ask for any ...

On the final day of September, the EEOC filed a sex discrimination lawsuit against the Coca Cola Bottling Company of Mobile, Alabama. The EEOC frequently files lawsuits, but this lawsuit had an additional claim not often seen, which may be a wake-up call to many employers.

That claim was based on the bottling company’s alleged failure to preserve employment records—specifically, employment applications.

Federal regulations require the retention of employment applications “for a period of one year from the date of the making of the record or the personnel action involved ...

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed into law an amendment to California’s gender pay equality law to make it one of the toughest equal pay laws in the nation. The new law takes effect January 1, 2016, giving California employers just a couple of months to prepare.

California and federal law currently prohibit employers from basing pay on an individual’s gender. The California legislature determined that a gender gap of 16 cents on the dollar still exists notwithstanding current laws. Accordingly, the new law includes strict standards with the aim of closing the gender pay ...

Martin Lomasney, an early 20th Century Boston politician, once said “never write if you can speak, never speak if you can nod, never nod if you can wink.” Just last week, the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit issued a decision illustrating the dangers of email communications and gave new life to a plaintiff’s claims that the reasons for her termination were the result of discrimination on the basis of her military service and disability.

In 2012, LuzMaria Arroyo, a United States Army Reservist and Veteran, sued her former employer Volvo Group of North ...

In May 2015, the U.S. EEOC announced that 11 of 53 offices would begin to implement the ACT Digital Pilot Program, which facilitates communication between the EEOC and parties. The pilot program recently has been expanded to more offices, and appears to be here to stay. While this modernization and electronic communication appear appropriate at first, employers must be aware of the potential for significant pitfalls.

Employer Benefits:

Employers can use an online portal to obtain copies of discrimination charges, submit responses, and communicate with the EEOC. Employers are ...

The EEOC and NLRB continue to actively review severance agreements, in addition to social media policies and employee handbooks. The provisions that draw the most scrutiny are waivers or releases of claims, confidentiality and non-disparagement provisions.

Any attempt to interfere with an employee’s right to file an administrative charge, communicate with the agencies, or participate in agency investigations, are troublesome. Remember that while an employee can waive or release an EEOC or NLRA claim, the employee can still file a charge of discrimination or an unfair labor ...

Welcome to the Labor and Employment Law Update where attorneys from SmithAmundsen blog about management side labor and employment issues. 

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