Posts from August 2015.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently released its second set of guidance discussing approaches to the excise tax on employer-sponsored health coverage, often referred to as the “Cadillac tax.” Starting in 2018, the Cadillac tax imposes a 40% tax on the cost of employer-sponsored health coverage in excess of $10,200 for self-only coverage and $27,500 for family coverage. Intended to target overly-generous employer-provided health plans, the Cadillac tax continues to be one of the most controversial parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as dollar thresholds set in ...

As we anticipated and previously discussed, on August 27, 2015, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued its ruling in the closely watched Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc. (BFI) case (Case 32-RC-109684). In rejecting over 30 years of precedent and the underlying Administrative Law Judge’s ruling on the issue, the NLRB’s pro-union majority established a new standard for determining joint-employer status. While the decision related to a company’s engagement of a subcontractor supplying workers, the NLRB’s new joint-employer standard will ...

Failure to document performance or conduct problems is a common mistake employers make. Typically, employee handbooks contain provisions requiring periodic performance reviews.  Similarly, handbooks contain discipline provisions that include procedures dealing with the issuance of warnings related to the violation of work rules.  How employers use and apply these provisions can make the difference in successfully defending claims.

A recent decision out of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia illustrates how critical it is to properly document an ...

Recently, a Federal Appellate Court held that there was no adverse action under Title VII for an employee who was suspended with pay during an investigation.  Jones v. Se. Penn. Transp. Auth., — F.3d—, No. 14-3814 (3rd Cir. Aug. 12, 2015).

The underlying facts are straight forward and typical of an employment discrimination suit:

  • The supervisor suspected an employee was guilty of wage theft.
  • The supervisor suspended the employee with pay.
  • The employee informed the company’s EEO/Human Resources Department that she intended to file a complaint against the supervisor; ...

In the opening sentence of its recent decision, Southern New England Telephone Co. v. NLRB, the federal D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals stated: “Common sense sometimes matters in resolving legal disputes.” If only that were always true in labor disputes.

The legal dispute in this matter centered on the fact that the company prohibited publicly visible employees—those who had direct contact with customers or the public—from wearing union t-shirts that said “Inmate” on the front and “Prisoner of AT$T” on the back. These shirts were part of a campaign by the union ...

In a recent decision, Central States Southeast and Southwest Areas, Health & Welfare and Pension Funds, 362 NLRB No. 155 (Aug. 4, 2015), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) held that an employee’s posting of a written warning at his cubicle was protected, concerted activity. The employee, Frederick Allen Moss, received the written warning from his supervisor for refusing to stop using his electronic tablet during a work meeting. In response, Moss laminated a copy of it and posted it next to his computer so that it was visible to anyone who entered his cubicle or stood at the ...

On July 22, 2015, OSHA issued an underground construction company in Texas six willful and nine serious citations with fines totaling $423,900, stemming from a trench collapse in February of 2015. While the citations and fine amount are not unusual under the new regime, the press release issued by OSHA following the issuance of the citations goes to great lengths to embarrass and harass the company, even identifying the company’s workers compensation insurer by name—presumably, in an attempt to try and prevent the company from obtaining insurance in the future. See the press ...

Green Cards May No Longer Always Contain a “Signature”

Employers should be aware that some Green Cards (“permanent resident cards”) now have an image stating “Signature Waived” on the front and back of the card where a signature would normally be located instead of the permanent resident’s actual signature. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) has indicated that these cards are issued to people entering the U.S. for the first time as lawful permanent residents after obtaining their immigrant visa abroad from a U.S. Embassy or consulate. This ...

Although not prevalent, and seemingly counterintuitive, some federal courts have recently addressed the issue of subordinate sexual harassment of their supervisors. This conundrum is especially interesting as employer liability is usually determined by the status of the harasser, including a subordinate, co-worker, or supervisor of the victim. Under Illinois law there is strict liability for employers when the harasser is a supervisor of the victim – i.e., there are no defenses available to an employer if sexual harassment is shown.

Under both state and federal law ...

Welcome to the Labor and Employment Law Update where attorneys from SmithAmundsen blog about management side labor and employment issues. 

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